Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Fabri-Quilt New Block Blog Hop 2015: Pink Doxies


2015 Fabri-Quilt New Block Blog Hop


Thank you Fabri-Quilt for sponsoring this blog hop! 

One summer treat for me was to be part of the New Blogger's Bloghop. As our time together was ending, our fearless leaders were working on continuing the the fun with this last hop. Thank you to Yvonne @Quilting Jet Girl, Cheryl@ Meadow Mist Designs, Stephanie@ Late Night Quilter, and Terri Ann @Childlike Fascination. Blocks made for this hop will all be assembled and completed into several quilts destined for charity organizations. 

60 participating bloggers each received an identical fat eighth's bundle of our palette named "Watermelon Summer." All were challenged to design an orignial 12" block using only the fabrics provided, and to publish their own tutorial. Our theme...

"Summer!"




"Sunrise at Sea"

This block appears more difficult than it is. I have simplified it so even a beginner sewist should have success. Email me with any questions at juliebehappy1@gmail.com.

Please Read 
  • I will refer to colors as those used in this sample block. 
  • All seams are 1/4". 
  • In order to assure success our block will be oversized--made approximately 13", and trimmed down at the end to a perfect 12 1/2". It is far easier to trim down than be left with an undersized block.


There are only 2 pattern pieces which may be easily drawn yourself. 

Piece A is a quarter circle. The radius is 6 1/4" or 16 cm.
Either use a compass or tie a string around a pencil and draw your line. Cut 1 template piece from freezer paper.



Piece B is a wedge 6 3/4" (17 cm) high. Top width is 3 1/4" across. Bottom width is 1 3/4". Draw a horizontal line 2" from the top. I suggest drawing this on lined notebook or graph paper. Cut out 1 template.



Cutting Rays and Points-turquoise and coral

Cut 1 piece 5" x 14" from each color.
Cut 1 piece 2 1/4" x 14" from each color.

Sew the 2 1/4" wide coral strip to the 5" wide turquoise strip on the 14" side. Sew the 2 1/4" wide turquoise strip to the 5" wide coral strip on the 14" side. Press seams open.

Using your wedge template, line up the marked line on top of the seam. Using a clear acrylic ruler and rotary cutter, carefully cut out 4 wedges of coral with turquoise tips, and 3 wedges of turquoise with coral tips.

Creating Points

Fold each wedge in half at the fat end. Feed the folded edge under your presser first, and chain stitch all 7 wedges. Allow 1/2" of thread to remain between each piece. This will keep the seam from unravelling. Snip only the corner on the folded side only being careful not to cut into stitching. When cutting the pieces apart, allow the thread chain to remain on the folded side to keep your seam from coming apart.


Turn each wedge inside out creating a point. I use the end of a pin to gently tease the points out without pulling out the stitching. Press flat.



Match opposite colors with right sides together. Line up pressed open seams. Pin together. Sew as shown. Start stitching at the edge with the points, and sew toward the narrower end.


Chain stitch 3 pairs of coral and turquoise, then stitch those pairs together adding the last wedge at the end. Chain piecing will save you time and thread!


Your rays should resemble this.


Press seams open.


Align your quarter circle template on your chartreuse fabric with the straight edge against the corner. If you are using a scrap of fabric, make sure the straight edges of this template are aligned with either the grain or the crosswise grain of your fabric.



Lightly iron the freezer paper to your fabric with the shiny side down. Trim the excess fabric away leaving 1/2" seam allowance. Keeping the template in place, press the seam allowance down around the curved edge. 


Fold both your rays and quarter circle in half 'finger pressing' the centers only. Line up the centers, and machine or handstitch into place. The outside edges will NOT line up nicely at this point.


Creating the Background or Foundation

White: Cut 1 piece 3 1/2" x 13"
Aqua: Cut 1 piece 4 1/2" x 13"
Lapis blue: Cut 1 piece 6" x 13"

Sew lengthwise edges together as shown. White to aqua. Aqua to lapis blue. Square this foundation to 13". 




Center your sun on the foundation so you will have at least 1/2" from the end of each outer point to the edge of the block. Pin in place. Measure with a 12 1/2" square to make sure you have adequate seam allowance on the edges of the white, aqua, and lapis blue sides. 




Stitch the sun to the foundation by machine or by hand on the edge of your points. 


Trim the edges so you have a 12 1/2" square. Parts of both end rays will be trimmed off, but this will give a realistic effect of a sunrise.



Edge stitch the sun to the foundation to hold in place.


Good morning, Sunshine!

Blocks posted yesterday can be found through these links. Prepare to be amazed at the talent of these new quilter bloggers. I was awed!

Today's Bloggers-Day 2

Host – Cheryl @Meadow Mist Designs


Stephanie @Quilt’n Party

Cristy @Love You Sew






Julie @Pink Doxies

Sarah @123 Quilt





Monday, August 31-Day 1

Host – Yvonne @Quilting Jetgirl



Wednesday, September 2-Day 3

Host – Stephanie @Late Night Quilter
















Thursday, September 3-Day 4

Host – Terri Ann @Childlike Fascination





Kathryn @Upitis Quilts



Francine @Mocha Wild Child




Amy @13 Spools


Sandra @The Bias Edge


The Doxies and I have had to take a few days to catch up on our garden. We'll be business as usual in a few days. See you then, and enjoy the hop as it continues two more days.

49 comments:

Yvonne @ Quilting Jetgirl said...

Wow, Julie, I love how happy and radiant this block makes me feel! I do not normally consider myself drawn to applique, but this block might just change my mind. :)

Julie said...

I don't enjoy handstitching unless it's a project I have ready to pack-and-go so I machine stitched this down. It didn't distract from the block, made it sturdier, and a whole lot quicker. My kind of applique!

Lisa J. said...

This is beautiful Julie. No need for advance worries here. It's very nicely sewn and it has such a summerly vibe to it. I like that you shared the template making process with us as well.

lelandavestudios said...

This is so pretty and unique! Thanks for sharing such a great tutorial!

Stitchin At Home said...

Julie this is a super block and the instructions are fantastic! I usually do machine applique.

Leanne Parsons said...

Such a beautiful block! It would be kind of fun to make suns in all different colours, kind of like an Andy Warhol quilt.

Sandra Walker said...

Ooh, I love Leanne's idea! Makes me think of a New York Beauty idea too. Love this oh-so-happy, no-rulers-required block! Great instructions and photos. :-)

Jayne said...

Who's the over achiever now Julie!!! What a gorgeous block, I love it! I've done very little applique. What a perfect block to try it out on! Great block!!!

Deborah Heddleson said...

I think you did a great job, Julie!!!

Tish Stemple said...

Beautiful block, Julie! And the name is so fitting. Great job!

Diana @ Red Delicious Life said...

This is so adorable! And it's just enough appliqué that I can handle!

Cassandra said...

This is such a lovely, sunny design! I adore the alternating colors on the tips of the sun "rays" and the striped background adds a lot of dimension to the block.

Sarah Craig said...

Great block, Julie, and a really nice tutorial!! Keep up the good work!

Thistle Thicket Studio said...

Wow! Beautifully designed and pieced! And love the modern colors this watermelon palette gives it.

Anonymous said...

When I first saw your block I said, (outloud), "oh how cute!" I bet the fabri- quilt fabrics were easy to work with as they were so crisp.

Kitty said...

I love this one!! :) You combine all sorts of bits I haven't really tried with abandon yet: curves, dresden-like blades, etc. Very clever and straightforward!

AStrangerView said...

This block is beautifully done! I love the two color dresdens. Great job and great tutorial!

Renee said...

What a fun block! It reminded me of a ferris wheel at first.

Mary Ellen said...

Always wanted to do a dresden plate .Thanks for the Tout.

the zen quilter said...

Wow this is neat. Your directions are great, and it looks like it might be a great skill builder block. Good job.

helenjean@midgetgemquilts said...

Brilliant block Julie, love Dresden and epp and improve sewing, my type of thing

Brenda said...

Dresdens are one of my favorite blocks to create! Your block is fabulous and I look forward to following your tutorial and making a quilt this way. Thank you for sharing and have a wonderful creative day!

Chopping Block Quilts said...

I have always been scared of sewing curves or trying any type of Dresden design but your tutorial makes it seem so straightforward. Great block!

Bernie Kringel said...

Absolutely adorable take on a Dresden. I love it!!

Cheryl said...

This block is too cute! I love your take on a Dresden plate!

Rebecca Grace said...

What an adorable sunrise block! Love it!

Wanda Dotson said...

It was easy to follow you and your sunrise. I like how you made your own wedge -- taking notes for later.

Margo Yang said...

I've always been intimidated with Dresden design, but your way of doing it makes me want to try. Thanks for an awesome block.

Dena@LivingWaterQuilter.com said...

I love the design, color choices and how it is pieced. It looks hard but your instructions and methods make it easy! I like the use of freezer paper for the quarter circle. I am looking forward to making one! Congrats.

Brianna said...

This is lovely, Julie! Great design. I can see enlarging it and making it in sunrise colours, maybe with an ombre background. bottom half water, top half sky. With a kayak in there..ha. Anyway, you've inspired me :)

Anja @ Anja Quilts said...

This is a fantastic block. You did an awesome job.

Terri Ann @ ChildlikeFascination.com said...

Such a fun dresden block Julie. I really love the detailed steps in how you made the pattern, now I feel like I can adapt this dresden design for any size block!

Sarah Goer said...

Great use of all six colors. I love the red and blue for the Dresden. I just made my first Dresden plates and was thinking two piece wedges would be fun to play with. I might have to go with some bold solids. Yours looks great!

SewPsyched! said...

I would love this as a giant quilt all on its own!! Lovely!!

Julie said...

Thank you, Lisa. The best thing I've ever done is learn how to do basic template construction. It's allowed me to tweak and change a pattern to fit my needs such as this one.

Julie said...

Oh! Good idea, Leanne. I've been experimenting with wedges of all kinds and degrees. They all give off a slightly different feel.

I think arranging them in a block of 4 and making sure the background moved from horizontal to vertical would provide a neat secondary pattern too perhaps. Or keep the suns the same and vary the background colors. Lots of variations possible, and it's an easy block to play with.

Julie said...

I was drawn to New York Beauties when I first started quilting, but the complexity threw me. Don't laugh, but this was the first Dresden I've ever done! I just had to figure out how to make it easier than the traditional instructions.

Thank you for pattern testing for me, and posting your beautiful test block on MMM, Sandra.

Julie said...

When I was thinking this block through, not once did it strike me as applique, yet it technically is. I think I thought of it more as a block made using a foundation. Thanks, Jayne.

Julie said...

Aww, thanks! The fabrics were crisp, but remember that spray starch is your friend, too! Can't beat that starch for creating crisp points before sewing down.

Julie said...

Diana, it's easy peasy. I'm not a huge applique fan, (quite a pun there!), and the foundation makes is sturdy with the pieced construction. Sometimes appliquing onto a whole piece of fabric can turn out wonky or stretched in one direction. If you run into problems, just use a thin piece of paper under the foundation fabric, and tear it away when you're done.

Julie said...

Heads up, but Sandra at Musings of a Menopausal Melon did a different take on colors when she made it as a test block for me. Check it out on her blog.

I think having a wider choice of fabrics available would lend itself to some really fun variationsm, and adding a kayak would be so neat to give it more dimension and perspective.

Julie said...

I think pattern making will get you farther than any other skill. Yes, I do enjoy playing with EQ7, and did start the design process there, but it only takes me so far. Nothing better than testing a block with your own fabrics and seeing exactly what might happen.

Karen said...

Julie, what a fun block! As a beginner, I'm really excited that you shared how to join wedges and how to make their points--who'da thunk?! I wandered around your blog and have to send you BIG thanks for the great zip pouch tutorials. I think I can pull some of them off :) Congrats on the honor of being included in the hop--well deserved!

Denise Finucane said...

great block idea, and I really like the pieced background - hadn't thought of that!

Kate said...

Very fun block!

Jackie said...

When I first saw the block I thought nope no way to difficult, but once you broke it down I changed my mind and it can and will be done. Thanks for sharing.

Liz said...

This is a great block and tutorial! I've always been intimidated by Dresdens thinking that they were super complicated, and was under the impression that a fancy ruler would be necessary. You've dispelled both of these myths for me, thanks! I love your technique, and will definitely be giving it a try!

Oui Crochet said...

What a fun block! It makes me want to head to the ocean!
Thank you for sharing with #FiberTuesdays!
Susie
www.ouicrochet.com

quiltingisinmyblood said...

Julie, this looks like a wonderful skills-building block for me to try sometime. Your tutorial is a good one, and I appreciate all the time and effort you put into it. Take care, Mary.