Friday, July 22, 2016

Minis: Quilts and Disciplined Progress In the Studio



"I spy with my little eye--a flounder, a whale tail, porpoises, kelp,..."

Behind all the fun I am having in the studio, I am working toward a big goal. This goal has a deadline, and I should have begun earlier. Even starting at the last hour I calculated that I could make it, but frankly, it's kicking my keester. (Can I say that here?) I have become very disciplined at showing up in the studio, systematically working through problems, and making good progress. Will I make the deadline? I don't know, but I will work until the end to try.


To be fair to myself, I'm building in little rewards--gold stars, if you will. One is time to play with my Gelli print plate, even if it's not entirely play. I am working through a list of techniques I want to try out with it for the project, and these little pieces of swatch fabric were the handiest thing to document each technique. Some of the prints I pulled were just plain fun stuff, and I went back into the piece with colored fine tip markers to highlight fun things I saw. 


 Many of the acrylic paints available in small bottles will state they are appropriate for fabric as well as hard surfaces. Generally they require heat setting with an iron or dryer. Others need to be mixed with a fabric medium, or another additive to adhere permanently to fabric. This was important to me so that is what I was testing.


Here I was using a multi-surface acrylic, but I also dropped dots of alcohol inks on top of them. Inks on acrylic used on fabric do not work the same as a paper substrate! There was no change. I used one of my stamps I made from foam shapes for a city street, and a glorious moon. Thinly painted acrylics dry quickly so going back into the piece a few minutes later is possible. I added some silver paint with a fine brush, and with markers added lights and text. 

Everything is heat set afterward, and there's no problem if they would need to be washed. 


The last to show, but first I made is this little piece that looks like a modern geometric abstract. How fun is that?

I'm cutting this short today. I have to go to the store to buy a bigger baby pool for the llamas. You heard that right. It's terribly hot already today, and tomorrow 10 degrees higher. Although they have a cool floor to lay on and an oscillating fan, they get hot. And, no, for those of you thinking it. They don't have quilts. Just a pool. Pictures to follow soon.

Have fun. 
Stay cool. 
Go sew.

25 comments:

  1. These little quilts are so pretty! You have a great color sense and style.

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    1. Thank you, Louise! I think we tend to be less strict with ourselves if we're just playing with color, and sometimes stumble on new combinations we didn't even think about.

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  2. I think that first piece is a bear in hiding. He is so cute. Love all the mini's

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    1. I think it's like looking at cloud pictures or ink blots, and am always surprised at what everyone else can see. Thank you so much.

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  3. Well. These are looking really cool. Are they potholders? I see a seam around them.

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    1. You know...they could be, but in a way I think they're too pretty for that. Also I'd want the heat resistant batting in them. I think I see them more as little pieces to hang, and appreciate for just a touch of color. I could see them on my desk on a tiny decorative arm, and I could change them out with the season. At 6" x 6" they don't take a long time to make, and I kept thinking they were like a quilter's version of Artist Trading Cards.

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  4. These are so adorable. I hope the llamas enjoy the pool.

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    1. Thanks, Anja. They are definitely a low-key fun project. About those llama boys: I wish they'd get the hang of it. Cecil loves being sprayed by the hose, and is SO curious about the pool, but doesn't understand what it's for. We need an experienced llama to get in and show them. They both prefer to lay inside the cool building in the blowing fan. Lllamas are strange animals.

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  5. I love how you see shapes in your pieces.

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    1. Isn't it fun what we see if we look? I only wish I was seeing the same with the Round Robin block. It's a toughie!

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  6. How interesting that you're playing and working and experimenting all at the same time. The work you're creating is truly inspiring. I love to work in mixed media but you, keester kicker, are a master!

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    1. Your comment has made me snicker since I read it. Keester kicker! I'm glad you like it, but mostly hope you're doing some yourself. I really think mixed media transfers well to fabric. Not everything, but it's sure an interesting path figuring out what does and how to do it. And even better, it's great to share what we've learned.

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  7. I always enjoy seeing all of your artistic creations with mixed media - you're very creative! As for the llamas, they may need quilts in the winter, so don't rule it out!
    Thanks for sharing on Midweek Makers
    Susan

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    1. Thank you, Susan. With as fierce a winter as we had several years ago, our sweet Misha was actually dressed in a sleeping bag to keep him warm. Poor thing! It was before I quilted.

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  8. I find your work quite amazing. And can only marvel at the amount of time you devote to it. My favorite is the City Street, because of the theme and the dark colors.
    Thank you for participating to my Fabric, Thread and Yarn link party. I wish you a beautiful Sunday!

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    1. I'm very grateful for your kind comment, France. I do spend an awful lot of time working on one thing or another in the studio, and most weeks I'm there at least a good part of every day. I have to admit I also spend a lot of time reading and researching how to do it all. I'm never bored, you can probably guess. Thank you for hosting your link up each week. I look forward to it, and the other poster's links as well.

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  9. Love your little quilts. What a great way to experiment.

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    1. YES! Little experiments with low risk and high return. And something done just for the sake of making. These are my little rewards. Thank you so much.

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  10. what a wonderful collection of gelli prints and mixed techniques you have just in one post! thanks for sharing. i too get excited to see what appears when i let art happen in the studio! be well!

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    1. You're welcome. I used to think it was a big deal to do one technique alone, but as I learned more and started layering them, I began to see how much more depth projects had. I'm just scraping the surface at this point, but there's been so much to learn about. Each new technique seems to open the door to the next, and yes, it's just a little addictive, too. Thank you for popping in to watch me play.

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  11. Such interesting little creations. Thanks for linking up with TGIFF @ A Quarter Inch from the Edge!

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  12. i love these little quilts, they are very morish. And never ever have i heard someone say they are off to buy a pool for their llamas.

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  13. i love these little quilts, they are very morish. And never ever have i heard someone say they are off to buy a pool for their llamas.

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It's always enlightening to hear your thoughts or suggestions. I try to respond in a timely manner, but admit life is very full here! I will return comments online if it's of general interest, but offline if a personal response is more appropriate. Give me a shout with anything urgent at julie@pinkdoxies.com, and I'll try to get right back with you. While I believe in free speech, spamming will not be tolerated, and as in all our interactions, speak kindly.

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Julie